SAMR Model Revisited

Today, I attended the EARCOS workshop, Technology in the Classroom, which was presented by Chris Toy. Being the good COETAILer that I am, I thought I would reflect on those parts of the presentation that resonated with me.

At the end of the day, we were asked to jot down three words that summed up the learning that had taken place. I wrote down “Collaboration equals transformation.” When I say “transformation”, I’m referring to task/activity transformation – the kind of transformation referred to in the model below. It came to me today that using technology to enable collaboration, whether across a classroom or across the globe, is a transformative use of technology. It’s transformative because two classes, half a world away, collaborating in real time simply wasn’t possible before. So, yes, collaboration equals transformation.

Another example of technology-enabled task transformation is publishing media to social media sites such as YouTube, Vimeo and Flickr (to name a few.) It’s transformative because social media sites, such as YouTube, have audiences numbering in the millions. For a student 15 years ago, simply publishing, let alone publishing to an audience numbering in the millions, was impossible.

Do you have any examples of technology-enabled task transformation?

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Weighing Up My Project Options

It’s been a while since I’ve posted on my blog – roughly two months I think. Anyway, it’s good to be back.

In the style of my other posts, let’s get straight into it.

Over the past week, my project has undertaken some major changes. (It feels really good to be blogging again, by the way.)

Originally, my plan was to have my grade 7 math students make imperial to metric converters (and vice versa) using Google Forms. Next, the students would embed their converters into either their own blog or into the class blog.

I feel this task would score quite high on the SAMR model, as the use of technology is transforming the task itself. In fact, this task would be impossible to complete without the use of technology.

Students would also be learning how to use Google Docs and WordPress – two things I’m a big fan of.

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But then some time this week, a better idea came to me – have the students make short two minute tutorials using ShowMe on their iPads and then upload them to some video sharing site. The plan is to then embed these videos in a site called Kids Academy, which has yet to be set up.

I’d like the students to make a video, or a couple, on something they’ve learnt in Math since the start of the school year – operations with negatives, HCF and LCM, prime factorisation, and sequences are topics they’ve learnt about thus far this year.

This idea scores high on the SAMR model too, in my opinion, as the use of technology in the task transforms the task itself.

I also really like the idea of this Kids Academy site – a site where kids can teach other kids (and no doubt adults too) practically anything.

Anyway, it’s been good getting these thoughts down on blog.

Any comments and/or questions, please leave below.

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Teachers, Students and Tech Standards

What I’ve Been Reading:

This Week’s Question:

  • How can teachers and schools ensure that students are meeting technology standards in their school within an integrated model?

First, wow, these questions (the ones for Course 4) are tough! Really tough. They’ve definitely gone up a level.

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Straight into It
Ensuring students are meeting technology standards, as you might expect, is no easy task. There are a number of pre-requisites that need to be satisfied before students can start meeting technology standards.

I want to stop here, just for a moment. I’m interpreting this question in two ways. The first interpretation goes like this: what needs to be in place to ensure students can meet technology standards? And the second interpretation goes a little like this: how can teachers and schools assess whether technology standards are being met by their students?

When I began this post, I was thinking more the first way. But now, I’m thinking more the second way. I might just try answering both questions.

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One thing that I feel needs to be in place before students can start meeting technology standards (like NETS) is that teachers are meeting the standards. Is this a given? Am I just writing about the obvious? I really don’t know.

How are we as teachers expected to measure the degree to which a student has met a technology standard if we ourselves don’t fully understand the standard?

I just want to add here that I understand that there are NETS for students and NETS for teachers. What I’m trying to say is that teachers, ideally, should be meeting both.

Without really meaning to, I’ve realised my answer to the first question (the first interpretation) could also be used to answer the second question. How can teachers and schools assess whether technology standards are being met by their students? Well, having a teaching faculty that already meets those technology standards is a start.

How About Through TPACK (Ensuring Students Are Meeting Technology Standards)?
I didn’t make the connection between this week’s driving question and TPACK until just now.

Drawing up a TPACK diagram for a unit (even for a course) is one way of ensuring that units are aligned with technology standards – that units are providing students with learning experiences that enable them to meet technology standards.

I need to gain more experience with TPACK usage before I can comment on their effectiveness and thoroughness.

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