Games Programming… in Grade 3!

What I’ve Been Reading/Watching:

This Week’s Question:

  • Write a blog post reflecting on your understanding of connectivism, MOOCs, global collaboration and/or badges and how how it applies to your curricular area, grade level, and own theory on technology in the classroom.

First, I don’t think I’m going to discuss how connectivism can be applied to my curricular area as I have already done so in the post, Googlepress. Instead, I’m going to discuss the games development platform, Gamestar Mechanic.

Two to three weeks ago, I started my two grade 3 technology classes on a new project – the objective of the project being to create a real computer game.

You’re probably thinking that this sounds like a lot of work and that maybe I’m aiming a little high for a grade 3 technology class and I would totally agree with you, had I not been introduced to Gamestar Mechanic.

Over the first couple of lessons, the students worked their way through the Quest.

The Quest is, well, just that, a quest (a game) in which students learn the fundamentals of games development. They learn about two common types of games: top-downers and platformers. They learn about sprites (good guys, bad guys, blocks, coins). They learn about important game elements like timers and player life.

Along the Quest, students accumulate badges which, in turn, unlock items that they can later use when making their own games.

All of my grade 3s have just about finished the Quest and are now creating their own games.

Gamestar Mechanic is more than engaging, it’s addictive. I’ve had numerous students working on their games outside of class. I’ve had one student upgrade to the premium account. I’ve also had one student develop a 20 level game – well beyond my expectations for the project.

Gamestar Mechanic is a fantastic way to introduce students, in particular, elementary students, to games programming.

EDIT: Here’s a link to a game made by David in Grade 3.

Image Credits:

  • Payneful by me
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One thought on “Games Programming… in Grade 3!

  1. Cool! What did the students think of the finished games? How did they evaluate the effectiveness of their games? Did they have any criteria for creating the games? (Can you tell I’m thinking like an MYP Technology teacher?) Love it!

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