Infographics in the Classroom

What I’ve Been Reading:

I really like this infographic. One reason is because, more so than other infographics I’ve come across, it communicates its dataset effectively. At a glance, you can clearly see the regression of Palestine over the decades.

This infographic, on the other hand, while having a nice design, fails at communicating its dataset effectively (in my opinion). To learn anything about Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, I really need to examine the infographic.

The data behind the second infographic appears to be unrelated, a random bunch of statistics, and maybe it’s harder (I’m guessing it is) to communicate all this effectively in a single infographic.

Back to the Point
In my grade seven math class, currently, we’re learning about functions, plotting functions, gradients and y-intercepts.

I was thinking, once the students have learnt about positive and negative gradients, a nice exercise might be to give them an infographic, like the one above (the one of Palestine), and have them plot the data.

The exercise could be extended by asking the students to find the equation of the resulting slope or line. (I might need to remind them before they start the exercise that their graphs need to be linear.)

I’m thinking, the complete opposite or the complete reverse could happen also: students are given a plotted function and then asked to go ahead and make an infographic that represents this data.

Second Idea
I haven’t really given this idea much thought. At least, not as much as the idea above.

A very relevant infographic exercise/project for my students (and for other international school students in Japan) would be to develop an infographic that shows Japan’s declining population.

At first, I thought the exercise/project would be best suited to geography. But now, I’m thinking it could work in math and technology too.

It could even become a cross-curricular project where, for example, students are given time in geography class to gather the data (and make sense of it) and then given time in technology class to create the graphic.

Image Credits:

Advertisements

One thought on “Infographics in the Classroom

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s